subreddit:

/r/NoStupidQuestions

24.9k

I'm Middle Eastern so I am unsure if this is a Western thing. Whenever I get dishes dirty I put them in the sink and run a little water over it so it doesn't dry out. When I'm ready to do the dishes, I will scrub each dish with a soapy sponge, put it on the bench top next to the sink (or a second sink if there is one), and when they're all soapy I quickly rinse them all and put them on the rack. I've lived in Australia my whole life but a lot of my close friends/family are Asian/Middle Eastern and they all do the same. This feels like the best way to save water and get the dishes nice and clean.

But in movies I always see a sink full of gross grey soapy water and people just pull scrubbed dishes out of it and put them on the rack !!!! Thought this was a weird movie thing but was cleaning up with my partner (white Australian), and he picked up my soapy unrinsed bowl to dry it!! I was grossed out that he'd just do that but he told me it's normal???? Do you put your soapy dishes on the rack ? What if they have food grease on them ???? Is this normal ????????

Edit: this has been the ride of my life. thank you everyone for sharing your favourite dish washing method and where you're from!!! It has been thoroughly fascinating, glad to hear I'm not the only one a bit picky with my cleanliness. Seems like the UK and Europe like the sink method the best, maybe because there's less mixer taps, and definitely common in places with water scarcity. Americans seem to have a lot of dishwashers, I'm not sure how universal that is though- we don't. To everyone who rinses after they fill up the sink. I see you and I love you. You're valid. To everyone else? Rinse your dishes please! Don't eat soap!

all 4536 comments

OGLizard

203 points

7 days ago

OGLizard

203 points

7 days ago

Some people do, but when you see it in a movie, it's entirely possible that it's simply because the set has no running water.

Next time you see a scene where people brush their teeth in a movie or on a sitcom, and never use the tap to rinse their mouthes out, it's the same thing.

rubbish_fairy

9 points

7 days ago

As a kid I was so self conscious about rinsing my mouth because I wanted to be as "elegant" as the girls in movies but my parents always insisted I rinse and gargle

iywiafi

4.7k points

8 days ago

iywiafi

4.7k points

8 days ago

My dad does this, and starts by the cleanest plates and finish with the dirtiest.

vice-roi

1.8k points

7 days ago

vice-roi

1.8k points

7 days ago

My parents always did them in a specific order with that method. Silverware first since it touches your mouth the most. Glasses and cups second since they touch your mouth. Plates and bowls then pans. Pans last because they tend to be the most dirty.

[deleted]

124 points

7 days ago

[deleted]

124 points

7 days ago

[deleted]

agilebeast1

44 points

7 days ago

Exactly, I do glasses > plates > silverware > greasy pans/pots

disguised_hashbrown

608 points

7 days ago*

This is what my grandmother did as well. We had two sinks, one drain stopper, and two dish racks.

We would fill one sink with soapy water and clean things in the order of how much food residue/how much they touched your mouth.

Once everything was soaped and placed on the soapy rack in the sink, we would drain the washing sink, rinse it out, fill the sink again with clean water, and dunk the dishes into clean water until the soap was gone.

Because the dishes were never covered in bubbles or globs of dish soap, a couple of dunks in clean water consistently got all of the soap off of our dishes.

If you’re doing a household’s worth of dirty dishes, this method saves water from what I understand. But an individual or a couple of people might not benefit from the sink/basin method as much.

Edit: I was not super clear; using a basin or sink is only better than rinsing under the tap. If you have a dishwasher, that’s usually going to save more water AND you can drink a glass of wine while it’s running.

TreeEyedRaven

340 points

7 days ago*

Dish washers are extremely water efficient now. Mine uses 2 gallons a cycle. My sink holds at least 15 gallons. I do a quick rinse when I’m done eating and put it in the dish washers and if food never dries on it, it cleans easily in the dish washer. The amount of hot water I save is pretty substantial, which is a lower power and water bill.

Edit: just to not reply to everyone who asks, my sink is 24”x18”x8”deep. It’s 3456 cubic inches, it’s probably rounded down a little because of curved corners, but also the bottom is slightly deeper in the middle than the edges. It’s a single basin. 15 gallons(I believe) is 3465 cubic inches.

Measure your sink, mine isn’t that big.

disguised_hashbrown

110 points

7 days ago

Oh I’m sorry I meant it saved water compared to running every single dish under the tap for four+ people’s worth of dishes. Dishwashers are the best solution, but can be really expensive or hard to retrofit into older homes.

If someone doesn’t have a dishwasher and does dishes for a large family, I at least recommend doing the utensils and cups in an extremely hot soapy basin and rinsing, just to save money on the water bill (or save potable water in a drought). Usually the largest mixing bowl in the house will do the trick for cups and flatware.

Zaranthan

51 points

7 days ago

Zaranthan

Please state your question in the form of an answer

51 points

7 days ago

I can vouch for washing cutlery and cups in the massive mixing bowl. It's our standard practice when camping, and hot water is at a premium.

disguised_hashbrown

37 points

7 days ago

I’ve never been camping. It never occurred to me that you would need to wash dishes on a camping trip haha.

Zaranthan

51 points

7 days ago

Zaranthan

Please state your question in the form of an answer

51 points

7 days ago

Our annual trip runs ten days, I'm not throwing that much plastic in the dump.

saltycouchpotato

23 points

7 days ago

Plus you'd have to pack all that trash out, anyway, which can get real inconvenient way out there.

JustSailOff

7 points

7 days ago

Kudos to you my friend. I live along the PCT in the Sierra Nevada's and am on a volunteer crew that picks up trash weekly. It's awful how disrespectful campers can be. Thank you for your consideration.

MSKs_Destiny

3 points

7 days ago

As an old small scale miner I have hauled actual truckloads of trash out of remote camps in the Sierras. City people just don't get it, nobody is there to clean up after them like they do in the city. The worst were when they dumped their ashtrays on the ground, and I smoked for 45 years.

voiceofAFO

24 points

7 days ago

My parents did something similar, but rinsed off each item under the running faucet. The running water also helped loosen stuck-on food, tho we also used Brillo pads for the worst!

ImFinePleaseThanks

18 points

7 days ago

You can only do that where reserving water isn't an issue.

I moved from Iceland where water is plentiful and dirt-cheap to Copenhagen where they've got some of the most expensive tap water in the world.

I had to adjust my wasteful ways quickly. Goddamn it, I got a $300 monthly water bill after having never spent more than $30 my whole life.

r0botdevil

37 points

7 days ago

Silverware first since it touches your mouth the most. Glasses and cups second since they touch your mouth.

This seems weirdly arbitrary. It doesn't really matter what does or doesn't directly touch your mouth if everything is directly touching your food.

vice-roi

23 points

7 days ago

vice-roi

23 points

7 days ago

Personally, I'd rather find a dirty spot on a plate than on a spoon, and I absolutely hate finding milk stains in a glass. I think its purely tradition though. I guarantee my grandmother made sure my dad washed the dishes in that order, and her mother made sure my grandmother washed dishes in that order, etc... Other people are saying they wash glasses first and such.

EvidenceorBamboozle

64 points

7 days ago

This is what to do with all types of cleaning. For example when washing the floors, start with the cleanest floor.

If you start with the bathroom floor you'll risk spreading urine all over the place.

burf

59 points

7 days ago

burf

59 points

7 days ago

You clean your bathroom floor when you clean the rest of your house? That shit is a completely different task, IMO. Bathroom floor and kitchen floor are both dirtier (bathroom by far) than your living room/bedroom, and those areas are each cleaned separately in my house.

Blitzboks

18 points

7 days ago

Blitzboks

18 points

7 days ago

I always clean my bathroom floor at the same time as the rest of them. However, under normal circumstances I don’t consider my bathroom floor to be any dirtier than the hallway outside it. I don’t even flush with the lid open, how could it be that much dirtier? If you have a young boy spraying urine everywhere or something, makes more sense I guess.

JamesEiner

14 points

7 days ago

My dad does this too but he doesn't give a crap about the order so we just end up with gross af water halfway through xD

bobbychong972

2.8k points

8 days ago

I do as you do and am form the uk. I see some people use just the soapy water without rinse and it’s weird!

szechk

986 points

7 days ago

szechk

986 points

7 days ago

Yeah, when people do this it’s often because they or their parents were raised on metered water, so this saves money.

lurkyvonthrowaway

530 points

7 days ago

Ok but soap residue can cause diarrhea

CallMeOatmeal

1.2k points

7 days ago*

Being poor is generally bad for one's health.

Edit: If you're going to award me, spring for the fucking gold you unhealthy fucks!

beepboopbeep321

85 points

7 days ago

If that ain't the most boring dystopia, or late stage capitalism

Freakychee

5 points

7 days ago

Ever watch that movie “In Time” it’s basically a time pun movie filled with puns about time but the premise was that “Time is Money” where people stay 25 and practically immortal.

But everyone had a timer and if your “time is up” you just die. So the poor have to do work and earn time and every day, inflation creeps up. The rich live forever and the poor die every day.

Why do all these dystopian future B-movies remind me so much of reality?

Stellarnt

199 points

7 days ago

Stellarnt

199 points

7 days ago

Yea it can cause diarrhea, but when you have no water, you gotta clean with what you have

no_one_somewhere

185 points

7 days ago

But you lose water due to the extra toilet flushing

[deleted]

93 points

7 days ago

[deleted]

93 points

7 days ago

[deleted]

cornhole99

81 points

7 days ago

...where did you go to college?

zeeotter100nl

87 points

7 days ago

Hell

OddlySpecificOtter

9 points

7 days ago

Prison apparently, nvm they get free water.

Big_k_30

154 points

7 days ago

Big_k_30

154 points

7 days ago

Why TF wouldn’t you take it from the tank???

BuildItFromScratch

13 points

7 days ago

Flavor

oogaboogs21

10 points

7 days ago

That is some prison rules shit, but they keep their toilets spotless.

Snickers_Goongo

12 points

7 days ago

What in the fuck

Psychological-Dig-29

101 points

7 days ago

I'm on metered water.. and wash my dishes with the hottest water possible constantly running. It's the most sanitary way, clean dishes are more important than the cost of the water used in my opinion.

GnomeChonsky

84 points

7 days ago

Unless your water is hot enough to scald you, then it is no way more sanitary and is a waste of resources. Same for showers and washing your hands. The water needs to be at least 165 degrees F to have any affect of killing bacteria. Warm water can help with removing things like grease but that's about the extent of it.

Dumbassahedratr0n

10 points

7 days ago

Man I am living on borrowed time... I've not had a dishwasher in 17 years and I vary between the "sink full of soapy water" and "soap, scrub, rinse" method

manimal28

52 points

7 days ago

manimal28

52 points

7 days ago

Unless you get third degree burns every time you wash, it isn't hot enough to help with sanitation.

benslacks

31 points

7 days ago

benslacks

31 points

7 days ago

Yep, hot water is mostly beneficial just for loosening up food and grease. The most water efficient way to do dishes is to have two tubs, one with hot soapy water, and the other with clean water. Use the hot and soapy water to get the dishes clean, then the second to rinse the soap off. That's pretty much how restaurants do it, also.

Bob_Geldofs_Eyebrows

25 points

7 days ago

Third sink for diluted bleach water

brown_felt_hat

47 points

7 days ago*

Fourth sink for sippies when you get thirsty.

wet_itchy_bunk

101 points

7 days ago

I was a professional dishwasher and obviously I wash dishes at home and you take the dishes you soak them in some soapy water you scrub them and you rinse them off if there's a lot of dishes you fill up the sink with water and put them all in there and let him soak for a little bit and then clean them obviously you rinse out the soap

eyeball-beesting

43 points

7 days ago

This is how I do it. Fill my sink up with hot soapy water, leave the dishes in there for a short while, run the hot tap and scrub dishes in the sink and rinse from the tap. Let them air dry, put away.

As a kid, we didn't rinse and used the same water for washing all the dishes of a family of 6. We also used a cloth and that cloth would be used for months- for the dishes and cleaning the kitchen. I remember how gross that cloth would get. I feel sick just thinking about it.

mytotsnviews

13 points

7 days ago

Ewww...Respectfully of course.

AWholeLottaShite

42 points

7 days ago

OMG I was a student in the UK and one flatmate from Ireland and another from the Netherlands (but British) always used to just take them out of soapy water, wipe them off and put them away. Was mad crazy.

jaetran

80 points

7 days ago

jaetran

80 points

7 days ago

Canadian here. I remember in high school food sciences class we would have one sink of soapy water and one sink of filled with “clean” water. The “clean” water sink we would use to rinse the soap off the dishes from the soapy sink then hand dry with dish cloths. It was gross as fuck. I remember I would just make the food but never eat it knowing how the dishes and food prep equipment were cleaned. At home throughout my life and now, I would just use a dish sponge with dish detergent and just scrub all my dirty dishes and rinse them under running water.

bostonchef72296

110 points

7 days ago

I hate to tell you, but if you eat at a small restaurant that doesn’t have a dishwasher, they have a 3 bay sink that is set up with soapy water, rinse water, and sanitizer. That’s just how it’s done. And they don’t even dry the dishes with a towel, they let them drip dry.

SpaceCowboy2010

56 points

7 days ago

If using sanitizer you don't unsanitized it with a towel, air dry is the way.

bostonchef72296

17 points

7 days ago

Yup, I just re-certified with Servsafe so I’m well versed in everything food safety.

qwyyd

74 points

7 days ago

qwyyd

74 points

7 days ago

i was gonna say, has nobody on this post worked at a restaurant or cafe?

bostonchef72296

57 points

7 days ago

Apparently fucking not lol. It’s hilarious. “Ew, a sinkful of water? but it’s used! Yeah, but you rinse that shit. It ain’t rocket science.

Cultural_Stranger_62

10 points

7 days ago

We had this where I worked. I remember the blue pellet I had to add to the sanitizer water.

bostonchef72296

5 points

7 days ago

Ah, the godforsaken blue pellet. I know it well.

DarkAngel900

3.9k points

8 days ago*

Yes, a lot of people who wash dishes in the sink, by hand use a sink of hot water and soap to soak the dishes, then they are either passed into a sink of clean water for rinsing or better yet, Piled up in the second sink for rinsing under the tap and then they go into a rack for drying. I don't know anybody who would leave the soap on the dishes, it must be an oversight in the making of the show.

Edit: I stand corrected. The way I described in common to the USA but the description by the OP is the way many do it in other places.

Sky_High8422

1.6k points

8 days ago

Sky_High8422

1.6k points

8 days ago

Not an oversight. I've lived in London for 8 years and have had British flatmates. They do that, which I found infinitely gross so I would have to always wash the plates I wanted to use before I used them. Not to mention she even washed her shoes in the kitchen sink. Some people are just ew.

[deleted]

631 points

7 days ago

[deleted]

631 points

7 days ago

Yeah I'm British and I'm the only person in my family who rinses the soap off the dishes before putting them on the drying rack. The two-sink method people are talking about sounds great but nobody I know has two sinks in their kitchen - you might have a little half sink next to the main one but not big enough to wash dishes in. I scrub the dishes in a bowl of soapy water and then rinse under the tap held over the half-sink.

westopher

453 points

7 days ago

westopher

453 points

7 days ago

You gotta remember at this point that people on the internet lost it when they found out about the washing machines in the kitchen, it's doubtful this will go down well.

Barrel_Titor

153 points

7 days ago

Didn't realise washing machines in the kitchen was unusual elsewhere, lol. I did always notice Americans on TV seem to have like top loading washing machines tho, never seen one of those in person.

mandaclarka

83 points

7 days ago

My mom got a front loading washing machine a while back and honestly it is still weird to me. Top loading is kinda inconvenient but it seems more normal cuz it's what I grew up with

Cyllid

92 points

7 days ago*

Cyllid

92 points

7 days ago*

In my head it just seems more sensible.

Top loading washer door malfunctions, bit of splashing.

Front loading washer door malfunctions, puddles.

Edit: Pls stop with serious replies. Why won't these people stop.

gbarill

70 points

7 days ago

gbarill

70 points

7 days ago

Also, you can add forgotten items at any point in the cycle on top-loaders... I think the reason they're popular now is because they're way more efficient with water.

beefybeefcat

22 points

7 days ago

Not sure about all models, but mine is at a slight angle inside, so the door end is higher up than the back end of the wash compartment. Also, a front loader doesn't fill up with water like a top one, there's just enough to wet the clothes (that's' why they are more economical on water and soap), so even if the door failed it's not like you have a whole tub of water pouring out.

Cyllid

14 points

7 days ago

Cyllid

14 points

7 days ago

I'm just a washing machine bigot.

Sasselhoff

15 points

7 days ago

Washing machine like "clothes washer" or "dish washer"? The comments below are messing me up, and I can't tell.

freeeeels

30 points

7 days ago

freeeeels

30 points

7 days ago

Well, both. We fucking wish we had a "laundry room" or whatever for a washer and dryer but usually you don't even have space for a dishwasher, and your (clothes) washing machine goes in the kitchen. And you then dry the clothes on a clotheshorse in the living room. Or a clothesline outside if you have a garden and it's one of the 4 sunny days of the year.

If this comment sounds salty as fuck, it's because I am.

Sasselhoff

10 points

7 days ago

Out of curiosity, where do you live?

Because that's what I had to do in China for the many years I lived there. We had this (ridiculously) tiny washing machine sitting in a corner of one of the bathrooms, which in China, are just one big room...no shower stall, no tub, just a toilet and a sink and a showerhead sticking out of the wall (you could legitimately shower and poop at the same time if you so desired).

We'd use that little guy and then go hang them up on a line in a room with a window that faced the sun. If it was raining for a bunch of days we wouldn't do laundry, because it would dry so slow in the lack of sun it would get stinking from the mildew that was starting to grow.

ArtAccount314

168 points

7 days ago

Do you know why they think letting a dish dry with soap still on it makes sense to them? Do they think it evaporates away? Or do they not mind that they'll be eating some soap next time they use the dish?

DamnAlreadyTaken

56 points

7 days ago

If you leave the soap to dry on the plate the grease won't stick to it next time.

:rollsafe_meme_template.jpg:

TheArtofWall

6 points

7 days ago

You unlocked hidden knowledge! Cooking in a large pot over a wood fire? Cover the outside evenly in dishsoap (or barsoap) prior. Then later, the soot comes off like magic!

[deleted]

47 points

7 days ago*

[deleted]

47 points

7 days ago*

[deleted]

[deleted]

68 points

7 days ago

[deleted]

68 points

7 days ago

[removed]

DamnDirtyHippie

62 points

7 days ago

Wtf I’ve never heard of this and am disturbed that people would do this.

chrysavera

33 points

7 days ago

And none of the explanations are sufficient. Wtf is going on.

PatientCamera

86 points

7 days ago

They aren't thinking about it, that's why they do stuff like this.

Uncle___Fester

79 points

7 days ago

How could someone not think about this?

PatientCamera

56 points

7 days ago

While there are some people who are mindful about everything in their life, the big picture and the details, more often than not people have blind spots about what they know/pay attentive thinking towards.

TheArtofWall

31 points

7 days ago

Thinking out loud here... maybe they just think nothing is cleaner than soap, and clean is good.

funktion

20 points

7 days ago

funktion

20 points

7 days ago

I mean, I bet the inside of a bottle of cleaning fluid is fucking clean

raches83

5 points

7 days ago

raches83

5 points

7 days ago

This is my husband. When our kid and some friends accidentally poured a bit too much bubble bath in a spa bath and came out covered head to toe in bubbles, I wanted to rinse her off but he laughed at me and was like, "It's soap, she's clean" and just didn't get why she needed to be rinsed.

MysticGachapon

45 points

7 days ago*

People don’t think about their culture.

Look at it this way - can you point to the exact spot where your personal space ends? Could you pinpoint the exact moment someone enters it?

No, you don’t think about that. But you still know when someone invades your personal space. It’s all unconscious.

Nobody thinks about their own culture; that’s part of what makes it culture. Mom told me to do it this way, so I do. Put the plate on the rack, and then wait awhile, soap is gone. Mom said so.

That’s literally all it is. There is no deeper meaning.

Learning about another culture is shocking, and challenges your entire understanding of reality itself. Funnily enough, here on reddit, I usually see English people losing their minds over their culture shock; funny to see the shoe on the other foot here.

19snow16

9 points

7 days ago

19snow16

9 points

7 days ago

Mom folded her towels into thirds, so I did and now my adult children do too LOL

mrcushtie

15 points

7 days ago

mrcushtie

15 points

7 days ago

This, so much. It's fascinating to think about all the things we take as ordinary that make us special, and conversely all the things we think make us special that are just ... ordinary

Ikhlas37

25 points

7 days ago

Ikhlas37

25 points

7 days ago

As someone whose british, we don't think much.

sundancer2788

28 points

7 days ago

In the US double sinks are fairly common. Maybe ours are just a bit smaller?

[deleted]

36 points

7 days ago

[deleted]

36 points

7 days ago

Your houses tend to be a lot bigger, I think.

CaptainAwesome06

219 points

7 days ago

My wife's niece was having horrible GI issues as a baby and nobody could figure it out the problem for the longest time. Finally, it was traced back to my BIL not rinsing her bottles out well enough. The soap left on the bottles made her constantly sick. BIL isn't very smart.

I don't have a problem with washing shoes in the sink. Your kitchen counters, sink, etc should be regularly sterilized. It's one of the most used rooms in the house and that's where you prepare your food. You need to routinely wash that shit down.

0accountability

29 points

7 days ago

Ingesting soap will definitely give you diarrhea. If your diet is shit already though, you might never notice. Pool little baby.

pinklambchop

18 points

7 days ago

It actually takes more soap than you'd think to give an adult diarrhea, like a whole table spoon. We still use a soap enema in some situations for constipation. The soap draws water into the colon, and breaks down the fecal matter making it easier to pass. We call those a Soap Suds enema, High Hot Hell of a lot. Order written: SS enema, HHH. There's your new fact for the day. They are uncomfortable, and very messy.

ComfortableNo23

5 points

7 days ago

Yep, good old 3H enemas made with a packet of castile soap and 1L hot water! (unless the doctor prescribes a larger quantity) LOL

Joss_Card

90 points

7 days ago

Joss_Card

90 points

7 days ago

If you're not at least passing a soapy sponge over the basin when you're done with dishes, ,you're not done with dishes.

Blachoo

24 points

7 days ago

Blachoo

24 points

7 days ago

The sink gets washed before I do the dishes and rinse. I have two sinks and an overhead drying rack but I cant stop everyone else from putting dirty dishes in the sinks, I've tried.

jinkside

32 points

7 days ago

jinkside

32 points

7 days ago

Sponges are super gross though. They're a concentration of potentially hazardous bacteria and somehow it only gets worse if you sanitize them.

DiaDeLosMuertos

9 points

7 days ago

What do you mean it gets worse when you sanitize them

jinkside

19 points

7 days ago

jinkside

19 points

7 days ago

Sponges are gross normally, but sanitizing them decreases the population of bugs for a short period and what re-populates is more dangerous to humans than what was there prior to sanitizing them. The examples, IIRC, were done with boiling the sponge for ten minutes in water.

Zaranthan

22 points

7 days ago

Zaranthan

Please state your question in the form of an answer

22 points

7 days ago

That's why I pour bleach into my hands and use that to clean the dishes. The kitchen is done when the copper smell dissipates.

buddhabuddha

125 points

7 days ago

Same. Many of my British flatmates over the years have done the same. Frequently came to use 'clean' dishes from the drying rack only to find them both soapy and oily :/

My parents are also British and use the sink of soapy water method, but rinse the dishes after scrubbing. I grew up doing that but switched to scrub and rinse (no sink full of water) once I went to college (in the US), and still do it that way. My Mediterranean friends all use the the scrub and rinse method as well.

doornumber2v2

70 points

8 days ago*

That's awful. I wash my dishes in a sink full of soapy water but I always rinse them before drying. I don't know why you would leave soap on them.

hirvaan

66 points

8 days ago

hirvaan

66 points

8 days ago

"because soap is clean!"

- dude it doesnt work like that. its a chemical compound, not "clean stone"

"shocked pikachu gasp"

pressmonday

170 points

8 days ago

pressmonday

170 points

8 days ago

From my experience living in the UK they run dishes under warm water while scrubbing it with a soapy sponge, then rinsing the soap from the dish and leaving it on a rack to dry. I think lazy people leave them to soak in the sink full of water and think that's the dish clean. Your old flatmates sound unhygienic af.

Superbead

98 points

8 days ago

Superbead

98 points

8 days ago

UK, can confirm. Pretty much everyone I've ever known just has everything sitting in a sink of grim soapy water, gives them a scrub then sticks them in the drying rack (presumably gravity is expected to clear the suds off the stuff). If they're particularly conscientious they'll later dry everything off with an increasingly gross teatowel.

Bonus points for those fucking stupid plastic washing-up bowls which more or less block the sink drain even when nobody's washing up, so if you want to drain pasta or whatever, you either have to get your hands temporarily gross hauling the thing out of the sink and making space for it somewhere, or trying to aim the colander into the gap down the side of the bowl. (Many kitchen sinks here still don't have separate draining sinks.)

Anyone who's spotted me washing stuff individually under a running hot tap with the drain open usually has a crack at me about it.

tea-rannosaurusrex

35 points

7 days ago

UK here. Completely the opposite experience. Maybe a north/south thing?

I’ve only ever seen people not rinse dishes in films etc. But to save water people often wash them in a filled washing up bowl before rinsing. Anyone my age has always thought it was gross to stick hands in that and so just used running water. To wash and then rinse at the same time. Also hate germy sponges and prefer a brush.

lulumustelidaeee

51 points

8 days ago

Never a truer word spoken. I've always thought it was totally gross so I've at least rinsed the suds off with cold water after, but my dad used to have a massive go at me about wasting water, he just puts them straight in the drying rack covered in soap! Why do we do this so wrong

Superbead

19 points

7 days ago

Superbead

19 points

7 days ago

The best thing I can think of for saving water and energy are hot and cold pedal-operated taps and instant hot water. You'd only need a single sink for everything then and wouldn't get shit all over the tap handles.

Unfortunately the advent of combi boilers in the UK means they have to set the valves and fire the gas up every time you open the hot tap, so doing that thirty times in a session would mean a lot of wear and tear on a boiler you're legally obliged to get an expert to repair.

DozyDrake

8 points

7 days ago

When i moved to uni I stopped using a washing up bowl since i didn't see the reason for it and i haven't looked back since. One reason my parents pointed out when i asked then is so that you empty out tea and stuff without getting it in the washing water which makes sense but doesnt merit having another massive piece of plastic

TooMuchMech

15 points

7 days ago

I can't stand seeing someone dump pasta full force into a colander sitting in the bottom of a sink. I've literally watched suds and particles from the drain below float up while it slowly drained the dreck back down. People think I'm crazypants for draining the pasta over a handheld strainer above the sink.

AlohaChips

7 points

7 days ago

I'm terrified of this but still sit the thing in the sink. It doesn't have a long handle to hold. The one thing it does have are little feet that keep the actual strainer bottom about one or two pencil-widths away from what it's sitting on. So I just monitor carefully to be sure the water level isn't backing up and flooding at the bottom of the strainer. I have to pour the pasta and water out quite slowly to do this successfully, but I find one-handing the sheer amount of pasta I usually cook (given the strainer's dinky handles) already make it hard to keep the thing from dipping down to touch the bottom of the sink anyway.

It probably also helps that the bowl part of it is 100% metal mesh (making it mostly see-through) and not just solid material with strategically drilled holes, so the visibility of what's happening to the water pouring through it is excellent for the majority of the pour.

Superbead

4 points

7 days ago

Yeah, our colander has a handle like a pan and I hold it over the sink for the initial bit, then sit it in the original pan to keep the pasta/veg a bit warmer than otherwise while I'm faffing around serving out.

Fortunately I've never seen anyone do what you're describing, but I can imagine exactly what you say.

reduser37

18 points

8 days ago

reduser37

18 points

8 days ago

Gross!

YorkshireBoi

71 points

8 days ago

English here, I've never considered rinsing them after washing. Might have to try that one cos it makes a lot of sense

ArtAccount314

79 points

7 days ago

Where do you think the soap goes when you put a soapy dish up to dry? Or do you not mind that there will be a soapy film on the plate next time you use it? This thread is blowing my mind, I never thought it would make sense to anybody to put up a soapy dish to dry without rinsing.

AlexAssassin94

42 points

7 days ago

I am also English and was the exact same as you - my whole family puts soapy dishes up to dry on the rack/wipe dry with towels. I started dating an American about a year ago and she said to me one day, upon inspecting my washing up skills, 'soap is still soap when it's dry'.

This blew my mind and I realised I was washing up wrong my whole life. I now rinse off after washing. My point is, don't feel bad, this seems to be an English thing.

Chapmeisterfunk

26 points

7 days ago

I'm English and washed dishes like that for years, until I lived with my Polish ex and she showed me the light. Can't imagine not rinsing them now.

Crunchy_Biscuit

10 points

7 days ago

cries in single sink

ChurchOfTheBrokenGod

38 points

8 days ago

If I have a lot of very dirty dishes, I usually have them all in a sink full of hot soapy water for rough cleaning, to get the bulk of the food, grease, etc. off - after which I pile them up in the second sink.

I then wash out the first sink and start running hot water into it with some soap. I then final wash each dish in the soapy water and rinse with the running water before placing in the drying rack. They are usually all washed clean and rinsed before the sink gets full of water.

Then I drain the sink while scrubbing it down one last time with the garbage disposal running, which gets everything squeaky clean.

Of course I only go through this process after loading the dishwasher for any that I couldn't fit.

kitanotenmangu

18 points

7 days ago*

I'm from Southern Europe, I lived in Holland and would invite Dutch friends to eat at my place. Some asked me why I rinsed plates with water instead of leaving a layer of soap. It isn't a thing they do at home. Also, I don't know if they changed habit but pubs in Amsterdam always had a sink full of soapy water and barmen quickly soaked god knows how many glasses in the same murky water and simply let them dry upside down. Gross.

Nounoon

39 points

7 days ago

Nounoon

39 points

7 days ago

I’m French and had moved in a while back with my then German girlfriend in Berlin. She did not rince the plates with the soap on when she was doing the dishes. After repeated offenses the discussion became heated up to the point where I went for a walk because to her it was stupid to just waste water rinsing.

During my walk, I actually found a video why many people in Germany do this. So at some point water was a bit scarce and not to be wasted, and Pril (dishwashing liquid brand) made some ads where the person put a drop of Pril in the rinsing water.

That made people to believe that if you put Pril in the rinsing water, you might as well save water and not rinse at all.

I came back home with this explanation, was blamed for trying to always be right (even though I know I was - right?).

So long story short, this was the beginning of the end of our relationship. I’m all in for cultural acceptance, I tolerated the “watch your poop” type of toilets, but I’m not having soap for breakfast.

mgiorgiom

16 points

7 days ago

mgiorgiom

16 points

7 days ago

Same here, German ex and no rinsing. In my case, on top of knowing that the dishes were not rinsed, I can also smell when they are not, it's this disgusting stale smell...

I never understood why they are so concerned about the lack of water: they have hundreds of rivers, it rains most days of the year, I have never been so wet in my life like in Germany... how come they behave like a desert society?

watsgarnorn

47 points

7 days ago

Asian people have a little bucket with strong.soapy water, they dip the sponge into that instead of submerging the dish, the sinks empty and they use the wet sponge and then rinse in the sink after. I thought that way was clever

tdl432

16 points

7 days ago

tdl432

16 points

7 days ago

My husband is Mexican. They do it the same way.

PuzzleheadedCoconut4

922 points

8 days ago

This annoyed me too in Australia. A sink full of water and soap... all dishes use same water... water gets gross... then they just take the dish out of soapy dirty dish water and put on drying rack... it doesn’t seem clean to me

My house growing up did an extra step and rinsed the soapy dish in scolding hot water or a second sink of scolding hot water to rinse.

Now a days we just debate on rinsing the dishes before they go into the dish washer... my parents believe dishes must be washed first and dishwasher is more like a sanitation cycle.

InSearchofaStory

313 points

7 days ago

Our dishwasher doesn’t properly clean unless you rinse first. It’ll technically be sterile, but the crumbs will still be there caked onto the dish, which is really gross.

TreeWithNoCoat

135 points

7 days ago

Yeah our last dishwasher was this way. We tried different detergents, but we recently bought a new dishwasher and we don't need to rinse anymore!

Also, some dishwashers have a filter. Have you cleaned it recently?

npeteyd

71 points

7 days ago

npeteyd

71 points

7 days ago

A lot of modern dishwashers have this filter, which is supposed to be cleaned on the regular. I can count on one hand how many people I know that know that...

oG_Goober

36 points

7 days ago*

My mom was about to throw out her dishwasher because it wasn't working to well anymore, her boyfriend knew this and cleaned it and it's still going, probably 20 years old

festering_anus_pizza

10 points

7 days ago

Reminds me of people that don't clean the vent filter things on their driers and wonder why their clothes isn't drying.

A_Drusas

11 points

7 days ago

A_Drusas

11 points

7 days ago

A common cause of house fires.

r0b0c0d

10 points

7 days ago

r0b0c0d

10 points

7 days ago

Something to try if you have a shitty dishwasher is dump a small about (like half the mount you'd use in the compartment) into the basin right before you start it.

The reason this works is some dishwashers have a 'pre rinse' compartment that will dump it in when you close the door. But many (like mine) do not.

There's a rinse cycle, and then a wash cycle.

Using detergent in both cycles is much more effective than using just pure water for the first. If you use pucks, it's a little overkill, but you can try tossing a second puck into the basin just to see if it helps.

samaxecampbell

63 points

7 days ago

Stop using the detergent packs, make sure your tap water is running hot before starting, and put some detergent in the prewash holder.

Watch this for more info: https://youtu.be/_rBO8neWw04

TrainTrackRat

24 points

7 days ago

My first thought was this YouTube video lol. Love how that guy can make light switches and fans interesting.

biologynerd3

18 points

7 days ago

Running the tap to hot before starting my dishwasher has changed my life. Sparkling clean dishes every time, even with caked on stuff. Highly recommend.

Xytak

31 points

7 days ago

Xytak

31 points

7 days ago

I knew it was going to be the guy from Technology Connections.

lunapup1233007

8 points

7 days ago

I know what video this is without even clicking the link.

PurpleYoshiEgg

5 points

7 days ago

Technology Connections? Clicks. Technology Connections!

upyouriron666

11 points

7 days ago

Ever since I saw this video a couple of months back and started following his advice, my dishwasher has been cleaning the dishes so well! No need to presoak, pre wash. Haven't seen any food caked onto the splayed since.

wampipap

28 points

7 days ago

wampipap

28 points

7 days ago

What is the point of a dishwasher if you need to wash your dishes before putting them in the machine? The fuck.

Nevermind04

31 points

7 days ago

I've heard this complaint a shitload of times and have been able to solve it every time. Dishwashers are designed to work with caked-on filthy dishes. You should not have to pre-wash. Assuming you've done the basic stuff like cleaning the filter, here are a few things I've encountered in the past:

One time I had to do some plumbing work because a dishwasher was hooked up to cold water instead of hot, but the rest of the time it was detergent related. Pods are garbage and barely do anything. They're supposed to be used in conjunction with powder but every dishwasher I've ever messed with works fantastic with powder alone. You don't even need good powder - the cheap bulk boxes are great.

In cases where you have particularly hard water, you need dishwasher powder with phosphates in it. Technically they can't sell that any longer for environmental reasons, but you can search for "Fryer Boil-out" powder on amazon and you'll find a few different brands that work in dishwashers. You can generally read the comments to find out if they work well on dishes.

marinus123

27 points

7 days ago

How you heard of lightly rinsing the dishes after you're done eating? One single step stops you from having that gross water. After you are done you just run some water over them and there's no residue left behind.

blowmie

63 points

7 days ago

blowmie

63 points

7 days ago

scalding* hot water

Unless the water was really getting on your case about those dishes XD

lunapup1233007

9 points

7 days ago

Stop scalding them for their spelling error.

blowmie

5 points

7 days ago

blowmie

5 points

7 days ago

I'm getting heated

reddits_aight

41 points

7 days ago

A sink full of water and soap... all dishes use same water... water gets gross...

I got news for you, this is what your dishwasher does too, with even less water. It's fine. Make sure you utilize your prewash slot if your dishes come out dirty, it's basically an extra wash cycle the machine is already doing (just with plain water if you don't fill it).

To the "basically wash the whole dish before the dishwasher" crowd: if you're going to do it twice anyway, why not let the machine take a crack first, then clean anything it missed?

MossyPyrite

20 points

7 days ago

Because cheese that survives the dish washer gets baked on to some materials and is harder than diamonds

GrimJudas

24 points

7 days ago

GrimJudas

24 points

7 days ago

“I’m soaking them.....” was an excuse I used to delay the inevitable task of doing dishes. But wouldn’t soak dishes now gross water, grosses me out.

Specific_Detective83

20 points

8 days ago

my parents would just dump dirty dishes into one sink filled with water and let it sit until the water was disgusting. never understood that.

WarmOutOfTheDryer

98 points

8 days ago

In restaurants and grocery stores you hand wash dishes in the three sink method, which does involve the two sinks of water that you're describing.

I don't actually like the system terribly well I prefer to rinse my dishes before I dunk them in the water. But overall it does work well for industrial quantities of dishes. At home I pretty much do them the way you're describing.

neverseeitall

58 points

7 days ago

The restaurants I worked at had this ultra high powered sprayer. So you would spray down everything before filling the first sink and that got rid of like 90% of the gunk anyway.

redditinmyredditname

11 points

7 days ago

Yeah unless it was ten minutes before closing, then you just go berserk and through everything in.

neverseeitall

14 points

7 days ago

haha, noooooooooooo. I would skimp on finishing nightly inventory before ever skimping on cleaning. That'll just make life harder the next day.

lol, unless I guess if you had the next few days off!

redditinmyredditname

4 points

7 days ago

That's not skimping on cleaning the dishes still get clean, but you have to refill the sink sooner

TheMapleStaple

7 points

7 days ago

You're also constantly doing the dishes as well, and that prevents stuff from sticking too much.

usernametaken_1984

22 points

7 days ago

Wash...rinse...sanitize. Am I right?

lichtersee

124 points

8 days ago

lichtersee

🧮

124 points

8 days ago

We do in Germany if we don’t have a dishwasher. I thought it’s common

edgeofblade2

93 points

7 days ago

How did I get this far down in the thread before someone mentions a dishwasher…

themixedupstuff

7 points

7 days ago

Now to derail the thread with rinsing vs. scrubbing dishes before putting them into the dishwasher.

Next-Count-7621

12 points

7 days ago

Depends on how dirty the dish is. If everything comes off with a rinse, goes into the dish washer but I do sometimes have to scrub

yesman_85

6 points

7 days ago

Same as in Netherlands. Don't know anyone who didn't do this 30 years ago when no one had a dishwasher.

nokvok

330 points

8 days ago

nokvok

330 points

8 days ago

It depends on how much you clean up. If you only wash 2-3 plates and glasses, using direct rinse-scrup-rinse uses less water in total. But you can run several sink-loads full of dishes through a sink full of soap water and then rinse them off in another sink full of clean water. That uses up much less water than rinsing every plate and glass individually, twice.

RootOfMinusOneCubed

145 points

8 days ago

Dishwashing habits have changed, and detergent manufacturers have had to change their formulas to keep up. They used to be optimised for washing a large load in a full sink. Now they have to optimise for a couple of dishes at a time, and the dishes not sitting in water.

It's likely that the movies are lagging behind. Either that or you've absorbed your imagery from old movies, but I'd bet on the former.

Here's one example of detergent reformulation:

[Dawn dish soap says you're washing your dishes wrong

hiii_impakt

193 points

8 days ago

hiii_impakt

193 points

8 days ago

If there's a lot of dishes, yeah. You fill the sink with water and add dish soap and soak the dishes in it. Then you scrub it with a sponge or something (it gets soapy from the dishwater). Afterwards, you rinse. This saves water because you're not running water to wash each dish.

zedsunn[S]

79 points

8 days ago

i am only using running water during the rinse, so i suppose closer to the same amount, I see the point of the soak though!

legendofcaro

24 points

8 days ago

We definitely rinse them... at least in the U.S. -- I can't vouch for Australia. I can't help feeling that your partner may have misunderstood and that white Australians really do rinse their dishes. But I guess I could be wrong.

The sink full of dirtyish water is a thing, but as for myself, I just run the water a little bit over each dish before scrubbing it with a soapy sponge, and then rinse it after. I hate having that dirty water, and besides, I am a single person with not many dishes to wash at a time.

verydumb24

36 points

7 days ago

Nope. I just leave the water running but the sink never fills up. Still can wash dishes like that.

INeed3dAnAccount

118 points

8 days ago*

No one does this in easter europe as well (as far as i know). I also always found the american movies weird. We usually just put the dirty dishes in the sink, sometimes let a bowl or something like that fill with water, so it doesn't dry up and it's easier to wash. Then when you wash the dishes you just... Idk.. Wash them. With dish soap and running water.

DieZombie96

17 points

7 days ago

I do that too lmao.

1-2-buckle-my-shoes

42 points

7 days ago

It may be in American movies but not common at all here. The majority of Americans rinse their dishes completely before putting it in the rack or we use our dishwashing machine. From the responses in this post it appears to be a very UK and Australian method.

DaHanci

12 points

7 days ago

DaHanci

12 points

7 days ago

Yeah, I’m American and my first thought was “...that is weird. I don’t think anyone does that in real life.” And then this! Yeah, I find it as bizarre as the OP; never heard of actually doing this. I cringed at the partner just pulling the dish out...

DeafMomHere

6 points

7 days ago

This is how I do my dishes, and I'm American!! I always thought the American movies with the full sink of water were like from the 60s or really rural South or something.

I usually have a cup that gets dirty, we put our silverware in that cup and I fill it with water. It sits there until I do the dishes. Every dish used gets a little rinse and places in the (empty) sink. I do my dishes daily so nothing ever piles up or anything....

When I'm ready to do the dishes, I just run the water and use a scrubby brush with dish soap and wash them all one by one. I don't understand why anyone needs to fill up a sink with water to do dishes. If you rinse after you use them, they are very easy to clean with a scrubby brush and running water.

I live in New England, if that makes a difference at all!!!

Most apartments I've lived in have had dishwashers, but the one I live in now doesn't , and that's how I do the dishes.

43rd_username

25 points

7 days ago

I have never in my life seen anyone do this in America. Reading this thread it's a UK thing, where they don't even rinse the soapy water off dishes. If movies do it it's a visual thing and not something we do. Blame the limey brits.

Commercial kitchens have the 3 sink method. Where the first is full of hot soapy water, the second has hot clean water and the third is full of cold sanitizer. It works very well, especially for the large number of dishes like you'd expect in a commercial kitchen.

CannabisaurusRex401

14 points

8 days ago

Most comments are about doing dishes at home but I'd add that in some restaurant/food service settings, we employ the 3 sink process. First sink empty for dirty dishes and spraying off food, second sink is soapy water for scrubbing, third sink is water with a sanitizer solution for food safety compliance. This is for places that don't have a mechanical dishwasher like the deli I worked at.

SilentJoe1986

60 points

7 days ago

I wash them in a sink full of soapy water then I rinse them with hot water to get the soap off. If there is still food and soap on the dishes then they arent clean. I don't know what it is you described those people did but it sure as fuck isn't washing the dishes.

neverseeitall

18 points

7 days ago

Finally someone not insane. My family has always used our sprayer on the sink to blast freshly used dishes with hot water to get off the bulk of the gunk, then stack them neatly until there is enough for a sinkfull(we have a two-sink system). Then we fill one sink with the dishes, very very hot water, too hot to touch right away and dish soap.

Then we let them soak and because the water is so hot, it actually lifts all the leftover dirt or grease from any little cracks or crevices. I see a lot of people wasting time scrubbing in-between every tine of a fork but by letting stuff soak in really hot water, all the silverware basically cleans itself.

After the water has cooled enough you can just put your hands in, we scrub all the dishes and set them into the empty sink. Once there is a pile of clean dishes, we spray them off thoroughly with the sprayer until nothing smells like soap at all.

It does use more water, true, but the dishes get perfectly clean, we don't poison ourselves eating soap and residue for decades, and the dishes last longer cuz they don't get any gross buildup.

SilentJoe1986

11 points

7 days ago

I thought that method was the standard.

neverseeitall

10 points

7 days ago

I thought it was standard for middle-income and higher households in first world countries. But even if only 50% of the people in this thread are being honest, man I guess we were wrong, and that's kinda scary.

Like, low-cost housing often only has one small sink, so that's a struggle. Though when I was in that sit I just set a rubbermaid tub on the counter and used it as a temp second sink. And really fancy houses sometimes only have one huge sink but that's cuz they also have really good dishwashers so the big sink is mostly for spraying stuff off.

If I was a karma chaser, I'd make a post about how disgusting it is that most people who use sponges in the kitchen are not able to smell the mildew and other bio-organic build up and wash their dishes with disgusting sponges their whole lives cuz they don't know that you have to sanitize them after using and make sure they will dry fast.

about 75% of anyone's house I've ever been in, I've had to make them throw out their sponge cuz the second I picked it up to clean my share of the dishes I was overwhelmed with a mildew smell. And it sticks to your hands also.

None of them were even able to smell it, but also didn't even realize you can't just let a wet sponge, that you didn't even rinse after doing the dishes, sit flat on a solid surface without just asking for it to turn into a petri dish.

MAGICHUSTLE

8 points

7 days ago

I’ve never washed my dishes like that. For me it’s

Wet dishes Scrub with soapy sponge Rinse dishes Drying rack.

However, in commercial kitchens I’ve seen the disgusting slop sinks you’re referring to. There’s usually a second sink for rinsing and a 3rd sink for sanitizing (bleach water I guess)

magnateur

22 points

8 days ago

magnateur

22 points

8 days ago

When i do this the dishes typically are already rinsed well, i also rinse them off in fucking hot clean water after soapwater Also wash the "cleanest" items first, typically glasses, mugs etc.

Aussie-of-Skellige

9 points

7 days ago

In australia yes we do it all the time. Water conservation was a big thing growing up. No dishwasher. Although our sink water never got that gross.

streuselcutie4427

41 points

8 days ago

Spent a year in New Zealand, and legit watched my macho manly friend don a pair of elbow length thick rubber dish gloves like Dexter's (Laboratory) mom and scrub dishes with half the sink full of soapy water. Most straight out of the 60s thing I've seen

neverseeitall

42 points

7 days ago

besides protecting your skin, wearing gloves lets you wash the dishes in much hotter water then normal and they get sooooooo much cleaner so much faster that way.

SPENC3RJ

6 points

8 days ago

SPENC3RJ

6 points

8 days ago

Yeah I think most sinks (the fancier ones are usually just one big ass sink) have two small chambers. One to the left one to the right (usually) in my apartment we keep the one with the disposal clear to rinse waste down and then soak in the other if we need to. Really just the pots and pans that got pretty bad

JohnFreez

7 points

7 days ago

I used to but because my wife was making a lot of dirty dishes I decided to buy a dishwasher. But I am from the Czech republic.

A0Zmat

5 points

7 days ago

A0Zmat

5 points

7 days ago

French there, I try to do what is faster and economical so :

2 sinks : one for washing, one for rinsing

I start like you do for glasses and things which must be very clean, BUT I keep the soapy water I used in the washing sink. Then for cutlery and dishes, I put them in the washing sink, add a bit of soap and very hot water, then I wash it with a soapy sponge before throwing them in the rinsing sink with a little water. It is very fast, because the soapy hot water disolves the fat and other dirty things while I'm rinsing the things in the rinsing sink (I always use more flowing water to be sure it is well rinsed). If the washing sink is too dirty or greasy, I empty it then switch sinks (using the former rinsing water as a washing water).

For drying, I never use a towel because it adds a nasty taste, I let them dry in the air on a drying rack

McBarron2019

7 points

7 days ago

My wife's grandmother does this. We were staying with them for a bit to help out her grandfather after he had his surgery and I went to do dishes and didn't fill the sink with water and she dog cussed me about how it's her house and she knows how to do dishes so I have to do them her way from here on out. She later came to our apartment and saw me doing them my way and made a comment as well. I just told her it was my house so she had to do them my way and moved on with my day

Nitro1966

17 points

7 days ago

Nitro1966

17 points

7 days ago

I still do it the old way. Sink full of the hottest soapy water I can stand. Glassware, cutlery, plates and bowls go in first and soak for a couple min. They are then washed and rinsed in said order. Then all the cooking pots and pans last. If I have particularly grimey pans, they are last to wash and I will fill a new sink of hottest soapy water. I despise grey water without bubbles. Maybe its totally psychological, but I gotta have my bubbles to feel like its clean.

Lina_Pirate

50 points

8 days ago

Im from California and recently moved to Lousiana, and i wash my dishes like you soapy spong and some running water, but my boyfriend from here fills one side of sink with dirty dishes and full of water, then fills another sink right side with fresh soapy water and drops dishes there and washes with sponge. He uses no running water. He says this method saves water!? I like my method seeems better!! So both methods are common here i think. Im Hispanic and hes black if that helps. xd

Jasmirris

19 points

8 days ago

Jasmirris

19 points

8 days ago

I don't soak my dishes in the sink because of any bacteria already in the sink plus I hate the the thought of the excess food just floating in the sink. 🤢 Yes I'm paranoid even though I clean really well. Its also just easier to clean the dishes off quickly and out them in the dishwasher unless they are a delicate dish. Those are washed quickly by hand and put on the drying mat by the sink or just dried and put away.

neverseeitall

28 points

7 days ago

::confused:: why wouldn't you just clean your sink and then do the dishes in a clean sink?

CandidQuasar

6 points

8 days ago

I’ll use the same water filled up to clear the debris and get it “surface clean” and the put the dishes in my dishwasher To make sure the dishes are clean. I’m from the US btw

Wodan1

5 points

8 days ago

Wodan1

5 points

8 days ago

My parents used to do it like this, fill the sink with hot water and soap and wash dishes like that. Personally, I rinse off any debris first and organise the dishes, then I wash with clean hot water and soap.

usrevenge

4 points

8 days ago

It depends on how people do it.

Some people let dishes pile up then wash them all at once.

Which are the times you would fill the sink and clean them.

Soap+ soaking in hot water then take each plate and wipe with a rag or sponge

Then you rinse and sit on a towel or rack of some sort to dry.

However a lot of people also do dishes as they appear, or everyone does their own dishes on average. In this case you would not fill the sink. You would wet the plate with hot water, add soap, scrub, then rinse and sit aside for drying.

Many sinks have 2 sides with 1 usually being for "dirty" dishes and the other for "clean" dishes

CalgaryChris77

5 points

7 days ago

The way you do it is how my wife does dishes... but man it wastes a lot of water, compared to filling a sink, I'm not sure how you can feel it's the opposite.

otacon7000

31 points

8 days ago

I'm from Europe and I've had the same situation (but the other way round) with my girlfriend from Asia. Me and most people I know fill up the sink, wash stuff in there, then put them to dry or even dry them with a towel. She (and everyone she knows) would have the water running throughout the entire process. It caused some irritation for both of us, but after all, it is the beauty of a multicultural relationship that you discover these small every-day cultural differences all the time.

animusdx

15 points

7 days ago

animusdx

15 points

7 days ago

I'm Asian American and I wash my dishes like your girlfriend does by leaving the sink on. Of course I don't have it on maximum blast but I feel like the dishes are just... cleaner. Sure it might use a bit more water but at least you're not reusing dirty soap water.

Taecia

14 points

7 days ago

Taecia

14 points

7 days ago

Don't you rinse the stuff ?